Slide arrow to your week: back
  •  

    1 week

  •  

    2 week

  •  

    3 week

  •  

    4 week

  •  

    5 week

  •  

    6 week

  •  

    7 week

  •  

    8 week

  •  

    9 week

  •  

    10 week

  •  

    11 week

  •  

    12 week

  •  

    13 - 14 week

  •  

    15 - 16 week

  •  

    17 - 18 week

  •  

    19 - 20 week

  •  

    21 - 22 week

  •  

    23 - 24 week

  •  

    25 - 26 week

  •  

    27 - 28 week

  •  

    29 - 30 week

  •  

    31 - 32 week

  •  

    33 - 34 week

  •  

    35 - 36 week

  •  

    37 - 38 week

  •  

    39 - 40 week

  •  

    41 - 42 week

Introducing solid foods babies 6 months

Introducing solid foods babies 6 months


Premature babies can start solids in a similar way to babies born after 37 weeks. However, depending on how early your baby was born (less than 34 weeks), they may not be ready to sit up and eat finger foods or a wide range of solid foods until 9 to 12 months or so. Be guided by your baby and how they are progressing.

Preparations

To prepare for introducing solids to your baby, you will need a teaspoon with smooth edges, an unbreakable dish (some have suction caps on the base to adhere to the table); baby bibs to save food soiling their clothes and some face washers to clean your baby's face and hands when finished. If you don't have something to sit your baby in, you may start with sitting them on your lap or in a baby chair then progressing to a high chair.

Eating food is a new skill and a totally new sensation. Many babies love feeling and playing with different food textures and may initially spit it out (or as they get older throw the food, plate or spoon). This is normal, so be prepared for a mess with food on your baby, in their hair and spillage on the highchair and floor, as well as perhaps on you! You may wish to spread some newspaper or plastic sheeting under your baby's chair or use an area that is easily cleaned when giving your baby solids in the early months.

Updated December 2007

Information sources

Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council. Dietary Guidelines for all Australians. 2003, ref N29 - N34.

Australian Breastfeeding Association

Food Standards Australia and New Zealand

Barker, R. Baby Love, Everything you need to know about your new baby (fully revised and updated), 2005, Pan Macmillan Australia.

NHMRC

World Health Organisation (2002), The Optimal Duration of Exclusive Breastfeeding - Report of an Expert Consultation, Geneva, Switzerland, 28 - 30 March 2001.

Page 3 of 3
 |<  <  1 - 2 - 3 >  >|

Get weekly development
updates on your baby and
you during pregnancy

  • Key milestones
  • Healthy tips and advice
  • A friendly online community
  • Delivered straight to your inbox

Enter your due date

 

Meal planning

Meal planning can make life a whole lot simpler, and d...

read more »

Take care of YOU!

Here's how to make some time for you - from mums w...

read more »

Homemade

Making your own pasta takes a little time but it will ...

read more »