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Shettles method for boys

Shettles method for boys

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The Shettles method for boys aims to time sexual intercourse to coincide with the day of the woman's ovulation (or when she releases her egg). This is based on the theory that boy sperm are able to swim more quickly to the egg and are more likely to 'beat' the girl sperm to fertilise the egg first, but they are more fragile and may not survive as long.



It also takes into account that 'boy' sperm may prefer a more alkaline environment. This is provided by the woman's 'peak fertile mucous' at ovulation as well as her vaginal secretions released during female orgasm. The Shettles method for boys claims an 80% success rate. However, the few, small studies done so far have been unable to support these claims.

Many of the 'Shettles methods' for boys are also general recommendations for couples who are trying to conceive a baby of any sex (but not necessarily a boy). This is because it helps couples to time sex at the woman's most fertile time. The theory that boy babies are more likely to be conceived if fertilisation happens close to the time of ovulation is thought to be why pregnancies resulting from artificial insemination are slightly more likely to be boys.

How it's done

To understand the following outline you may need to review the information about charting the woman's menstrual cycle and her physical signs relating to ovulation. As a broad overview, the Shettles method for having boys recommends:

  • Allowing sex anytime after day 1 of the woman's menstrual cycle and up until her fertile phase (or about 4 days before ovulation) but using condoms during this time.
  • Avoiding sex (or the man ejaculating) totally during the woman's pre-fertile phase (about 4 days before ovulation). This is aimed at increasing the man's sperm count and increasing the couple's chances of having a boy.
  • When the woman's basal body temperature (or BBT) lowers, usually the day before ovulation, and/or as soon as she notices the peak 'eggwhite' fertile mucous, having sex without a condom. (If you wait until your temperature actually rises, indicating ovulation has already happened, this may be too late to conceive that cycle.
  • If you have sex during the 3 to 4 days following ovulation, you will need to use a condom. Once this time elapses you can freely have sex without a condom until the woman's next menstrual period (or perhaps for several months if you have a positive pregnancy test!)

Other additional words of advice include:

  • If the woman has an orgasm just before the man ejaculates, or soon after ejaculation, it increases the alkaline secretions in her vagina and uterus. This is supposed to favour 'boy' sperm. It also makes the woman's uterus and fallopian tubes to have rhythmic contractions, drawing the semen up towards the newly released egg.
  •   Intercourse with deep vaginal penetration is supposed to deposit the sperm as close to the cervix as possible, avoiding exposure to the more acidic vaginal environment. This may be achieved by the man's penis entering the woman's vagina from behind (rather than using the traditional face to face missionary position).
  •  The woman should try and stay in bed for at least 20 to 30 minutes after intercourse. Some women will place a pillow under their hips, to raise them slightly, aimed at encouraging the sperm to enter the uterus.
  •  Men should avoid exposures that may reduce their fertility and possibly favour girl sperm. This can entail not smoking and not having hot baths and saunas or wearing tight constrictive underwear or clothing (boxer shorts are ideal). Heat around the testes and 'fertility toxins' are supposed to favour the survival of girl sperm and to reduce boy sperm counts. If the man is exposed to too many toxins, it may reduce his fertility to the point that he is unable to have any babies.

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Shettles method