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Flying tips, flight crew and babies flying

Flying tips, flight crew and babies flying


Flying

'Economy class syndrome' - DVT

Car and bus trips

Many women travel as part of their job or for pleasure. In some cases a trip is planned to be home, or be nearer to family and/or friends for the birth of the baby. Essentially, travelling during pregnancy is not a problem, but there are a few precautions to be mindful of, especially when travelling long distances. There are also some practical considerations to think about when planning your travel.

Flying

birth TIPS for flying

Flight crew

Babies and flying

Many women ask if they can fly during pregnancy. The answer is "yes" but you will need a plane to do it! Generally, the concerns about flying while pregnant are more related to the possibility of you having the baby mid-flight, rather than developing a health problem affecting the pregnancy. However, if you have had health complications recently (such as heavy bleeding, threatened miscarriage , premature labour or very high blood pressure) most caregivers will advise against flying, at least until the complication has settled or is well controlled. In this case, your airline may require a doctor's certificate to verify your fitness to fly.

In the past, there were concerns that women (and their babies) might not receive enough oxygen during air flights. This can be the case for small, non-pressurized planes (and you are advised not to fly in these during pregnancy unless absolutely necessary). However, during a commercial flight a lack of oxygen is highly unlikely, unless the cabin pressure unexpectedly decreases. Even then, jets are equipped with individual passenger and staff oxygen supplies to ensure you receive sufficient oxygen. Studies looking at altitude physiology for pregnant women during flight have shown that babies receive the normal amount of oxygen they require on commercial flights.

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